De-stress, Lower Histamine Naturally

Numerous studies have documented the role of stress hormones on mast cell activation and histamine release. Fighting that stress has been my number one priority for years now, and it should be yours too. Here’s a few fun ideas to turn a day at home into a mini spa experience to chill out your immune system and hopefully prevent those stress hormones from filling up your inflammation bucketSo, sit back, relax, and learn about some of the best histamine-lowering ways to bring the spa experience to your home.

ENJOY SOME DETOX WATER

Most spas offer fruit and/or herb-infused ice water. You can bring that idea home by making up a pitcher or water cooler filled with filtered or spring water and adding some antihistamine fruits and herbs. Remember that extreme temperatures, like the cold, are histamine triggers, so you may wish to avoid ice cubes or very cold water. 

Here are some of my favourite combinations:

  • Blueberries + Peaches
  • Cucumber + Lemon + Mint
  • Green Apple + Lemon + Mint
  • Cucumber + Basil
  • Pomegranate + Tarragon

MAGNESIUM FOOT SOAK

Not giving the body magnesium for just four days significantly triggers histamine inflammation.  Aside from being soothing, pure magnesium chloride bath salts are an option for boosting those levels, especially if you’re sensitive to magnesium supplementation (like me! never been able to tolerate any supplement I’ve tried, but I use the transdermal oil nightly).

Prepare the water by bringing 1 quart to a rapid boil. When the water has boiled, remove from heat, add the fresh herbs (if using, and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes to steep. Strain into a 1 quart container and discard (compost) herbs. Then rinse your cooking pot or kettle and bring 3 quarts of water up to bathwater temperature (104°F/40°C). Pour the herb-infused water and the warm water into a foot basin (or turkey roasting pan). Place on a towel in front of a comfortable chair. Test the water to make sure it’s tolerable (warmer is better as it helps promote circulation and open up your pores). Add ½ cup of magnesium salt if desired. Soak feet for 15 to 30 minutes, adding more warm water as needed.

Antihistamine Foot Soak Combinations:

  • A handful of mint leaves + 4 rosemary sprigs.
  • Lavender flowers
  • Chamomile flowers
  • Peppermint + Soda + Salt (4 peppermint tea bags, 1 cup baking soda, 1/2 cup of Epsom salt).

If you’d like to find some histamine-friendly commercial beauty & personal care products, read that post here.

RELAX WITH A MASK

  • Ayurvedic Herbs: Mix ½ tsp neem leaf powder and ½ tsp Triphala powder with enough organic cucumber hydrosol (or another hydrosol) to make a paste. Apply to face and allow to set for 5 minutes before washing off with warm water and then a tolerated cleanser. Follow up with a hydrating oil (like jojoba) if you like.

Both neem and Triphala have antihistamine properties. Read more about the benefits of the herbal blend, Triphala, here.

  • Nigella sativa: Mix ½ teaspoon of Nigella sativa oil into 1 tablespoon carrier oil, such as jojoba. Leave on for 45 minutes and then wash face with a tolerated cleanser.

Read more about the benefits of Nigella sativa for histamine intolerance here.

  • Activated Charcoal:  Mix together the contents of 2 pills of charcoal, 2 drops of moringa oil, 1 teaspoon of cucumber hydrosol in a ceramic bowl. Apply to your face with your fingers. Leave it on for about 15 minutes, until dry. Wash face with a tolerated cleanser.

Activated charcoal is a great detoxifying agent that may be helpful for lowering allergy-induced inflammation. The moringa oil is both antihistamine and anti-inflammatory.

And of course, don’t forget the cucumber slices for your eyes.

MOISTURIZE WITH ANTIHISTAMINE OILS

I’ve found that pure oils are a great way to moisturize without needing to worry about the long lists of ingredients on most “natural” creams. Not only do these oils have antihistamine properties, but they also have antiageing and skin beautifying benefits. These oils are a great way to wrap up a spa experience — moisturizing your face after a mask or your feet after a foot soak.

Check out my post, 5 Antihistamine & Anti-Ageing Collagen Boosting Oils to learn about pomegranate and other oils that could help you stay youthful.

EAT SPA-INSPIRED FOOD

Spas are all about eating light, nutrient-dense, organic whole food meals and snacks designed to support the body’s natural detoxification pathways. Try antihistamine smoothies, raw fruits and vegetables, soups, steamed or sauteed vegetables (like in a stir fry), and salads.

For some antihistamine smoothie ideas, check out this post or you could grab a copy of my Anti-Detox cookbook.

A plate of fresh fruit could include apple slices (cut horizontally to make rounds with stars in the middle), blueberries, pomegranate arils, mangoes, peaches, honeydew, cantaloupe, watermelon, or Bartlett pears. Or make a colorful fruit salad with fresh mint or basil ribbons.

Big green salads are always a good way to go. Add plenty of DAO-boosting olive oil and fresh antihistamine herbs like parsley or cilantro. Some wild caught salmon, if tolerated, is a great source of protein paired with anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. But add whatever protein you like.——————————— Sources ———————————-

https://www.thepracticalherbalist.com/holistic-medicine-how-to/herbal-foot-baths-how-to-copy/

Vadas P, Perelman B. (2003). Activated charcoal forms non-IgE binding complexes with peanut proteins. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 112(1), 175-179. [Activated charcoal is often used in emergency management of poisoning to prevent toxins from being absorbed through the stomach into the bloodstream.  We demonstrate that activated charcoal also forms inactive complexes with peanut protein, preventing peanut bound to activating charcoal from triggering allergic reactions]. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12847495